Posts filed under ‘expressions’

Good Culture starts with “Good morning”

According to a recent study, thirty-seven per cent of all workers feel lonely at work! Add to that, recent Gallup polling found that close work friendships boost employee satisfaction by 50% and people with a best friend at work are 7x more likely to engage fully in their work. Clearly, friendships at work matter, and produce better results.

Yet, in today’s hustle-bustle, stressed out, uptight world, it’s not at all uncommon for a person to show up to work, do their job, and go home without any notice, acknowledgment, or recognition by others…even by their boss. People want and need to be seen, recognized, and valued; they want to matter. And one of the easiest ways to meet that need is with a simple greeting, a sincere “good morning” and a smile! It’s easy, It costs nothing, and it can be the difference between an employee staying or going!

In just two years, our company, will celebrate 100 years in business – an amazing achievement by any standard. Even more remarkable when one considers that Ewing has remained a family-owned business all those years. Ewing’s success is often attributed to its unique family-like culture, a “culture of caring”, where employees care about each other, their customers, and the company’s success, and where the company cares about developing its employees and creating opportunities for them to grow and prosper. A natural outcome of this level of caring is a greater sense of belonging and connection, not common in many large organizations today.

One of the risks for any large rapidly growing organization is that it can easily become impersonal through shear numbers or with excessive focus on everything but the one thing that makes or breaks the collective culture…the people. Wise leaders who are aware of and genuinely care about their people, set the example by or facilitating belonging and connection every day, every interaction, with every employee.

Organizations like ours have a unique opportunity to continue to be that special company with a remarkable culture of caring and “family”. It begins with leaders, and then teams and individuals creating connection, eyeball to eyeball, smile to smile…beginning with a simple “good morning”…tomorrow morning, and EVERY morning!”

Lead on!

September 27, 2019 at 2:25 pm Leave a comment

Carpe Diem

Life’s greatest lessons come not from text books or the halls of academia. They come to the unsuspecting, from the unexpected experiences of life. They come to us individually as we solo our personal climbs through life, and they come to families and teams as they together face the challenges and opportunities that are simply…part of life.

Many of my work friends and I suffered the sudden and very sad loss of a co-worker and friend this week.  We all experience similar losses.  So what can we learn from heart-breaking events such as these?  So many things… but three in particular rise quickly to the surface:

First, the incalculable value of time. Unlike other precious resources, time is finite. There is only so much – sixty minutes in an hour, twenty-four hours in a day, three hundred sixty-five days in a year. We can’t save time, make time, or even find time. It just ticks by, and so, due to its finite nature it is more precious than any other thing. What’s more, none of us know how much of it we will have, so every minute counts! As the French essayist Montaine wrote, “The value in life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them.”

We learn to “seize the day” and to treat every day as if it’s our last.

Second, the importance and value of heartfelt expressions. How many of us, after the loss of or separation from a dear one, yearn for one more chance to hug, smile, thank, encourage, lift, or love. How many have thought “if only I’d have known…”? What would we have said or done to let them know how we feel, how much we appreciate them, or how great we think they are? It’s often the things not said that leave the greatest pain. So, don’t hold back.

We learn to say what’s in our hearts whenever it might lift, encourage, or cheer another.

Third, some things ARE more important than others. And as it turns out, people are most important. In the busy-ness of life we often lose this perspective; too often we allow an event, a task, or some other undertaking to overshadow what really matters. When asked what are the most important things in life, everyone freely admits: family, friends, or loved ones. However, when viewed through the lens of the choices we make and the way we spend our time, our resources, and our energy, do we walk the talk? Too often we allow the urgencies of life to crowd out our real priorities, or the emotions of the moment to endanger a relationship. People really do matter.

We learn that people and relationships are what makes life worth living.

Thank you Kristie, for the lessons learned this week.

April 27, 2015 at 1:17 pm Leave a comment


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